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Judy Rymer Speaks On the Making Of “I Will Not Be Silenced”
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“A nation that is afraid of its people…”
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Before America Was America: John Peter Zenger
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Frederick Douglass on Free Speech
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‘I Will Not Be Silenced’ Wins the 2016 Free Speech Award
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Islam Through Human Rights
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‘I Am Sun Mu’ – The Artist Without a Face
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Here’s What Sen. Elizabeth Warren Forgot to Tell CEO John Stumpf
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AmericanINSIGHT on Instagram
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Theodore Roosevelt on Free Speech

“A nation that is afraid of its people…”

JFK’s presidency lasted only two short years, but his tenure involved a sequence of history-altering events including the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Bay of Pigs Invasion, the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the founding of the Peace Corps, the construction of the Berlin Wall, the Trade Expansion Act, and the heated American Civil Rights Movement.

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Islam Through Human Rights

‘Honor Diaries,’ American INSIGHT’ 2015 Free Speech Award-winning film, investigates violence against women in Muslim-majority societies by exposing the hidden prevalence of honor killings and female genital mutilation. The story is driven by a roundtable discussion of nine of Islam’s most notable women’s rights activists led by Raheel Raza.

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‘I Am Sun Mu’ – The Artist Without a Face

Sun Mu made international headlines when he became the first North Korean defector artist to hold an exhibition in China. The story of his escape, his life as an artist in exile, and his preparation for the Beijing exhibition are the subject of Adam Sjöberg’s film ‘I Am Sun Mu,’ an “Official Selection” at American INSIGHT’s 2015 Free Speech Film Festival.

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Theodore Roosevelt on Free Speech

 

Commander of the “Rough Riders” cavalry during the Spanish-American War, Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) made a name for himself as a robust outdoorsman, scrappy soldier, clever statesman and American nationalist. He was one of the most outspoken proponents of American interventionism of his time.

Roosevelt believed a country could only progress if men fought and died for ideals they believed in. A product of the bloody 19th and early 20th centuries, Roosevelt’s nationalist ideology fell just short of fascism.

Roosevelt penned his essay “Lincoln and Free Speech” at the conclusion of the First World War, an international conflict sparked by rampant, surging nationalisms across Europe. Just as Abraham Lincoln pressured then-president James Polk to intensify America’s war efforts against Mexico, Roosevelt thought it necessary to pressure any president who spoke of peace during time of war. His essay on presidential skepticism stemmed from his vehement dislike for Woodrow Wilson and his policy of isolationism during WWI.

Teddy Roosevelt’s legacy as a presidential skeptic rides on the coattails of his legacy as a war hero and great American executive.