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Fighting for Free Speech in World War I: Eugene Debs on the Homefront
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King Hammurabi’s Code
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Is It Possible for College Students to Defend Free Speech?
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John Milton’s Areopagitica
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Turkish Journalist Can Dundar Sentenced to Five Years Hours After Failed Assassination Attempt
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Palestinian Law Student Creates Controversy With “Smelly” Remark to Israeli Dignitary
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Political Satire in Germany: A Win for the Rule of Law, A Loss for Free Speech
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Opening the Door to Free Speech in China
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“No law except the Putin Law” – Carole Keeney Harrington Discusses Pussy Riot’s Attempt to Bring Free Speech to Russia and the Making of Her Film, Pussy Riot: The Movement
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Former Greece Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis Argues for a Reunification of Politics and Economics

Fighting for Free Speech in World War I: Eugene Debs on the Homefront

One of the loudest voices of this period is Eugene Debs, outspoken proponent of labor unions and leader of the Socialist Party. Labeled a “traitor” by the Wilson administration, Debs takes the stand at Nimissila Park in Canton, Ohio. Before him stands a crowd of hundreds of anti-war protestors. Debs knows that he can, and probably will, be arrested for the comments he is about to make. However the self-proclaimed orator has made a name for himself by speaking out against injustice. He will not be silenced by anyone, not even his government.

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Palestinian Law Student Creates Controversy With “Smelly” Remark to Israeli Dignitary

During Harvard Law’s panel discussion “The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict and the U.S.,” third-year Palestinian law student Husam El-Qoulaq inquired of visiting Israeli dignitary Tzipi Livni, “how is it that you are so smelly?” He added, “It’s regarding your odor, very smelly.” Many spectators including Law School Dean Martha L. Minow immediately rose to condemn the comment’s alleged anti-Semitic undertone. Others in the room rose in defense of El-Qoulaq’s right to Free Speech.

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Political Satire in Germany: A Win for the Rule of Law, A Loss for Free Speech

In an attempt at pushing the boundaries of Free Speech in Germany, Böhermann wrote his own satirical poem about the prime minister complete with references to the size of his private parts, his alleged fascination with child pornography, and his actions against the Kurdish minority group of Turkey’s northern border regions. In response, Erdogan called for the prosecution of Böhermann, one of Germany’s most popular comedians.

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Opening the Door to Free Speech in China

Deng Xiaoping’s 1978 Open Door Policy opened China’s markets in the hopes that international trade would produce a level of modernity comparable to that of the West. China’s growth has increased exponentially since its market opening. But with the lessons of the failed USSR, Deng Xiaoping understood that extreme measures must be taken to ensure his Open Door Policy did not open the sequential door to Freedom Speech and the Rule of Law.

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“No law except the Putin Law” – Carole Keeney Harrington Discusses Pussy Riot’s Attempt to Bring Free Speech to Russia and the Making of Her Film, Pussy Riot: The Movement

Under the surface,Moscow’s splendor is overcast with an unforgiving, distant demeanor and a dark past dominated by violence, patriarchy, and oppression. Carole Keeney Harrington, after her experiences writing and producing Pussy Riot: The Movement surmises, ”Russia is full of brilliantly intelligent and breathtakingly beautiful people, but the Russian people simply don’t know how to be free.”

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Former Greece Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis Argues for a Reunification of Politics and Economics

Varoufakis says the separation of the economic from the political sphere is a process that was begun decades ago, and “like a population of predators that are so successful in decimating the prey they must feed on that in the end they starve, similarly the economic sphere has been colonizing and cannibalizing the political sphere to such an extent that it is undermining itself causing economic crisis.”

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